Showing posts with label 1950s Classic Concept Cars. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1950s Classic Concept Cars. Show all posts

Dodge Firearrow

Dodge Firearrow 1950s American classic concept car

The Dodge Firearrow was an American-Italian collaboration. Coachbuilders Carrozzeria Ghia - based in Turin - finessed the fine details. Their craftsmanship was second to none. Resplendent in red - and sporting a polished metal belt-line - the Firearrow was an elegant, well-proportioned automobile.

Ghia liaised with Virgil Exner. He was chief stylist for the Firearrow. Exner - and his colleagues in the Chrysler art department - came up with a clean and tidy design. Restrained and tastefully-placed lines were the backdrop for a plethora of neat features. The way the bodywork overhung the wheels was a sweet touch. Inside, the wooden steering wheel bespoke class. Twin seats were sumptuously upholstered.

The Dodge's engine was an all-American V8. 152bhp shot the Firearrow III coupé up to 143mph. The Firearrow timeline was a long one. It started out as a show car mock-up. A working prototype duly followed. Decked out in yellow - and with wire wheels - it featured in '54's 'Harmony on Wheels' extravaganza. After that - along with the coupé - came the Firearrow and Firebomb convertibles. The idea was just to whack a bit of wow factor back into the jaded Dodge brand. But - so big a hit were they with the public - that a limited production run was soon mooted. It was privately funded - by Detroit's Dual Motors. 117 Firebomb replicas were built. They went under the name of the Dual-Ghia. Virgil Exner - and his feverish work ethic - had delivered on two fronts. Dodge received its much-needed facelift. And the Firearrow lit up the landscape, in its own right!

Cadillac El Camino

Cadillac El Camino 1950s classic concept car

When it came to Fifties 'dream cars', GM set the design bar high. The Motorama was a travelling show of avant-garde automobilia. The Cadillac El Camino was a 'space-age' case in point. El Camino Real - The Royal Highway - was a sobriquet for Highway 101. While the El Camino sounded Spanish, it was American as apple pie. It was also one of the most influential concept cars ever created. Many El Camino features would be seen on production Cadillacs, by decade's end.

Show car though it was, a V8 was duly dropped into the engine bay. 230bhp was, in theory, available. El Camino capacity was 5,422cc. Had Cadillac's boffins wanted it to go touring, it was good to go. As it was, the lure of the open road played second fiddle to the car's publicity-seeking uses.

To that end, the El Camino had styling to die for. Its pearlescent paint-job, in particular, was a cinch to turn heads. Silver had never looked so good! And the radical roof-line was almost as engaging. Curvaceous windows - and deftly-drawn pillars - were a visual treat. Brilliantly topped off by brushed aluminium. Front bumpers referenced bullets. Front arches revealed intricate wheels. At the rear, tail-fins were a pop-up delight. The El Camino blended seamlessly into the Motorama mix. Cadillac's class of '54 also comprised the Espada and Park Avenue. But the El Camino, above all, would be their blueprint for the future.