Showing posts with label 1970s Japanese Sports Bikes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1970s Japanese Sports Bikes. Show all posts

Suzuki GS1000

Suzuki GS1000 1970s Japanese classic motorcycle

The Suzuki GS1000 was not blessed with the most exotic styling, ever to have flowed from a designer's pen. Indeed, visually, it was straight out of Studio Old Skool. But what the GS lacked in aesthetics, it more than made up in the technical stakes.

The heart of the GS was its in-line four-cylinder engine. We are talking 'classic Jap' here. The bike cruised to a top speed of 135mph. Cornering was consistently solid and stable. Its frame was robust, suspension adjustable and tyres wider than normal for Seventies superbikes. So - properly maintained and adequately set up - handling was never an issue. When the time came, its dual front disc brakes were more than capable stoppers.

Anyway, beauty is, as they say, in the eye of the beholder. For some, the GS was a beautiful bike, precisely because it was big and basic - not despite the fact. 'That's the way a motorcycle should look', they would have said. 'Forget about frills 'n' flimflam!' Heavy metal over cosmetic plastic. So, the Suzuki GS1000 was something of a wolf in sheep's clothing. On the surface, it seemed a placid enough beast. Even slightly staid, perhaps. But rider beware - if you twisted its throttle!

Kawasaki Z1

Kawasaki Z1 1970s Japanese classic motorcycle

The Kawasaki Z1 was nick-named the 'King' ... which kind of says it all! Suffice it to say, it was well-received - on its release, in '73. Riders had been putting up with past its sell-by date technology for years. As often as not, it was down to outdated management techniques. All that was blown away by the Oriental invasion. When the Japanese - and their new wave of machines -disembarked at the Isle of Man, 'Brit bikes' were dead in the water. The TT wins which followed presaged the future - not just for racers, but roadsters. When the Z1 hit the showrooms, the future had arrived.

The Z1's twin-camshaft, four-cylinder motor left its road-going rivals reeling! The ageing 'thumpers', twins and triples simply could not compete. The Z1 took cycle parts, too, to another level. Performance stats had gone up a gear … well, several gears, actually! The 'King' came, saw, and conquered! Before long, the British bike industry was a mere memory.

The new bike heralded Kawasaki's iconic 'Z'-series. A plethora of 'superbikes' - from the 'big four' Japanese manufacturers - followed. Never again would bikers settle for second-best. From that point on, a test-ride delivered outstanding performance, handling and braking - or the deal was off! The Kawasaki Z1 had secured its place in motorcycling's pantheon. As for Brit bikes ... the king was dead, long live the 'King'!

Honda CBX1000Z

Honda CBX1000Z 1970s Japanese classic motorcycle

The Honda CBX1000Z was a child of its times. In the Seventies, performance was everything. Japanese superbike performance, that is. At the time, the 'Big Four' - Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki and Yamaha - were more concerned about how a bike went than how it looked. The 'CBX' could have been cited as a case in point. Its inline-six motor was prioritised over other areas of the bike. Its 24-valve DOHC air-cooled inline-six motor, to be precise. It had been designed by a one-time GP engineer. Most famously, Mike Hailwood's Honda RC166 racer had displayed the virtues of a 6-cylinder layout.

Given the girth of its 6-pot block, the CBX handled well. Its manoeuvrability was still more impressive when its cycle parts were factored in. By today's standards, the tubular steel frame, telescopic forks, narrow wheels and high-profile tyres were spindly. And dwarfed by the mass of the motor. Straight handlebars - and twin rear shocks - were similarly conventional. In fact, the width of the engine was deceptive. Just 2″ wider than the CB750. That was due to its unusual layout. The alternator and ignition parts were located behind the block. Well out of the way, should the bike ever find itself sliding down the road!

Flat out, the CBX did 140mph. Striking though that was, it was as nothing next to the noise the bike made reaching it. The high-pitched howl of a CBX at full chat is something that once heard, is never forgotten. Especially with a slightly less than legal pipe fitted. At which point, it sounds as much like a jet plane as it does a motorcycle! Sadly, the CBX did not sell well. In time, its design would be diluted down into less extreme machines. But, motorcycling would be the poorer without bikes like the CBX. Look on them as a challenge. Get a corner just right - and there are few feelings like it. The Honda CBX1000Z was flawed, for sure ... but fantastic fun!