Showing posts with label 1970s Sports Bikes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1970s Sports Bikes. Show all posts

MV Agusta 850 Magni

MV Agusta 850 Magni 1970s Italian classic sports bike

In standard trim, the MV Agusta 850 was a class act. Add to that the Magni factor - and quality increased exponentially. Arturo Magni had managed MV's racing department. MV took 17 consecutive 500cc World Championships. That told you all you needed to know about what Arturo Magni brought to a two-wheeled party!

In time, Magni turned his attention to roadsters. To that end, he set up his own engineering facility - in Gallarate, Italy. Soon, a steady stream of MV 850s started rolling into his workshop. They did not have far to come. Magni duly introduced them to his own take on engine components and chassis modifications. The Magni effect was marked. A top speed of 140mph was now available. The 850 was weighed down by a bulky shaft final drive. When Magni's chain-drive conversion kit had been fitted, handling, too, improved. Also key to stability was Magni's custom-built frame. The single spine original had been replaced by one with two top tubes. Magni's motor-related mods included uprated cams, high-compression pistons and a four-piece exhaust system. Suffice to say, you could hear it coming from a mile off!

The 850 Magni was visibly race-bred. A full fairing - complete with rider number - said it all. The Magni's stats justified its looks. High-grade parts - from Marzocchi, Koni and Brembo - added further fuel to the performance fire. Arturo Magni - following on from his high-calibre racing exploits - had slipped seamlessly into the world of road-oriented specials. High price tags came with the territory. But - for those with the disposable - MV Agusta's 850 Magni was the pinnacle of hand-built pedigree!

Laverda 750 SFC

Laverda 750 SFC 1970s Italian sports bike

The Laverda 750 SFC was a production racer. Originally conceived to compete in endurance races, it went on to be a shining light on the roads as well. The 'C' in its name stood for competizione. While we are at it, the 'F' stood for freni, Italian for brakes. That referenced the improved drum sets, with which the SFC came equipped. Ceriani suspension sealed the roadholding deal - telescopic forks at the front and twin shocks at the rear. Always a good sign, the SFC won first time out. That was the Barcelona 24 Hours race - at Montjuic Park, Spain. The bike's bright orange paintwork was a cinch to spot, even at night - for both spectators and pit crew alike!

On the road, too, the SFC was a scintillating sight. 549 SFCs followed on from the prototype. A certain commitment was required of the rider - since they were far from 'ergonomically correct'. Low clip-on handlebars - and rear-set footrests - meant relaxation took a back seat to a racing crouch. And it was a single back seat, at that! At least the SFC's smart half-fairing was a concession to comfort - keeping the worst of the wind off. And - certainly in handling terms - the SFC was eminently user-friendly.

Potentially, SFC riders needed all the handling help they could get. The bike's parallel twin engine came with high-compression pistons - fueled by 36mm Amal carbs. A close-ratio 5-speed gearbox was fitted. Top speed was 125mph. An injudicious twist of the the SFC's throttle, then, and a race-style posture may well have proved welcome. Better a little discomfort than finding yourself lying upside down. The SFC weighed in at just 454lb - but that is a lot to pull out of a ditch! So, the Laverda 750 SFC was a true Seventies superbike. It combined impeccable Italian styling - and the technical wherewithal to keep it that way. Hopefully!

Bimota SB2

Bimota SB2 1970s Italian classic sports bike

'SB' stood for Suzuki/Bimota. It signalled Bimota's standard practice of incorporating other marques' engines into its own bespoke chassis. In the case of the SB2, power was provided by the Suzuki GS750. The 8-valve inline-four motor peaked at 68bhp. That gave the the SB2 a top speed of 130mph. Credit was also due to its slippery lines. A dry weight of just 440lb sealed the high-speed deal. This was still the Seventies, do not forget.

The driving force behind the SB2 was Massimo Tamburini. He had been a Bimota co-founder. Tamburini fitted the 'legendary engineer' bill to a tee. In his time, he had designed chassis for 250 and 350cc World Championship-winning bikes. In '77, Tamburini tipped his technical brilliance into the new Bimota. It was a gimme, then, that the SB2 would handle as well as it went. Ceriani telescopic forks - and a first-of-its-kind rear monoshock - did the business suspension-wise. They were duly hitched up to a tubular steel space-frame. The monoshock alone separated the SB2 from its rivals ... in every sense of the word!

First and foremost, though, a Bimota is about style. As befits a firm from Rimini, Italy. Certainly, the SB2 ran true to form, in that regard. Its bodywork wrote the book on 'swoopy'. The tank protector/seat was a self-supporting one-piece - which saved the weight of a subframe. That innovation - like the rising-rate rear shock - would subsequently be seen on mass-produced machines. So, Bimota - that consummate special-builder - had done what it did best. In the beguiling form of the SB2, it merged dynamite design and top-drawer technology. Again!

Ducati 250 Desmo

Ducati 250 Desmo 1970s Italian classic motorcycle

Ducati's 250 Desmo was a nailed down design classic! The famous firm began in Bologna, in '26 - producing electrical parts. That might generate a few wry grins amongst bikers of a certain age. Italian machines have traditionally been praised more for aesthetic than technical perfection.

Ducati's signature set-up, back in the day, was 'desmodromic'. It saw engine valves closed by cams - rather than springs. That provided more precise control of valvegear moving parts. For a marque so synonymous with styling, 'desmo' was definitely a feather in Ducati's cap. The 250 was the baby of the newly engineered range. Though of reduced capacity compared to its bigger siblings, the 250 was still blessed with a fair lick of speed. Indeed, it fell just a tad short of the totemic 'ton'. In handling terms, too, the 250 had plenty in its favour. Weighing in at less than 300lb - and with finely-tuned suspension - its rubber side remained resolutely glued to the tarmac. Saying that, clip-on 'bars, rear-set footrests and a solo seat coaxed riders into finding the limits of adhesion!

The Desmo was designed by Leo Tartarini. He drew the 250 with simple, strong lines. They were all that was needed. The bike had dynamism built-in - by dint of its 'racy' parts list. So, the 250 was as strong visually, as it was technically. Certainly, its desmodromic valve-train was a key asset. But, it also possessed poised and purposeful looks - belying its size. Dimunitive it may have been, but the Ducati 250 Desmo married technological innovation with innate good looks!

Suzuki GS1000

Suzuki GS1000 1970s Japanese classic motorcycle

The Suzuki GS1000 was not blessed with the most exotic styling, ever to have flowed from a designer's pen. Indeed, visually, it was straight out of Studio Old Skool. But what the GS lacked in aesthetics, it more than made up in the technical stakes.

The heart of the GS was its in-line four-cylinder engine. We are talking 'classic Jap' here. The bike cruised to a top speed of 135mph. Cornering was consistently solid and stable. Its frame was robust, suspension adjustable and tyres wider than normal for Seventies superbikes. So - properly maintained and adequately set up - handling was never an issue. When the time came, its dual front disc brakes were more than capable stoppers.

Anyway, beauty is, as they say, in the eye of the beholder. For some, the GS was a beautiful bike, precisely because it was big and basic - not despite the fact. 'That's the way a motorcycle should look', they would have said. 'Forget about frills 'n' flimflam!' Heavy metal over cosmetic plastic. So, the Suzuki GS1000 was something of a wolf in sheep's clothing. On the surface, it seemed a placid enough beast. Even slightly staid, perhaps. But rider beware - if you twisted its throttle!

Benelli 750 Sei

Benelli 750 Sei 1970s Italian classic motorcycle

It is a truism that the Italians are past masters of design. In engineering terms, too, they have often been ahead of the game. How far the latter held true for the Benelli Sei, though, is a moot point. For sure, the Sei was visually impressive. Six-cylinder bikes usually are. The jury was out, though, in the court of motorcycle performance stats.

Certainly, the Sei's engine looked superb. For non-Europeans, by the way, sei is Italian for six. As did its twin sets of triple-stacked exhaust pipes. When it came to horsepower, however, it was another story. Even by '75 standards, the Sei's top speed of 118mph was hardly earth-moving. Not for a six-cylinder sports bike, anyway. In the market-led surge of Seventies superbikes, Benelli's rivals all supplied quicker machines. And Ducati, Laverda and Moto Guzzi needed half as many pots. Or less!

It was not like Benelli did not know how to make bikes go fast. After all, they had been GP 250cc world champions, in 1950. And then again, in '69. But - at least in the case of the Sei - race success did not trickle down to the roadster. Saying that, the sleek contours of the Sei's 'six-pack' bodywork certainly helped. So far as buyers were concerned, they went a long way toward offsetting what the Benelli Sei lacked in the 'go' department!

Kawasaki Z1300

Kawasaki Z1300 1970s Japanese classic motorcycle

The Kawasaki Z1300 is one of a select set of bikes that sport six-cylinder engines. Such a powerplant is always going to pack a punch. In the case of the Z1300, though, it does not make quite the impact you might think. Why so? The radiator plastered across it. In profile, it is still an impressive piece of kit. But - viewed head-on - the 'Z13' paid a visual price for its water-cooling.

Top whack for the big 'Z' was 135mph. It reached that speed with consummate ease. The inline 1286cc motor gave an output of 120bhp. Manoeuvrability-wise, a bike with a wet weight of 670lb was never going to be agile. That said, the Z13's handling was impressive for a bike of its size.

The Z1300 will forever be bracketed with Honda's CBX1000Z. Another Seventies siren, that machine, too, radiated 'six appeal'. The CBX, though, was a brash brute of a bike - more muscular than the Z13. The latter blended power with refinement. Its shaft final-drive, for example, was much easier on the fingers than oil-soaked chains! So, in many ways, the Kawasaki Z1300 was the perfect motorcycle. So long as you were not a designer. In which case, that pesky radiator grille rather upset the aesthetic applecart!

Kawasaki Z1

Kawasaki Z1 1970s Japanese classic motorcycle

The Kawasaki Z1 was nick-named the 'King' ... which kind of says it all! Suffice it to say, it was well-received - on its release, in '73. Riders had been putting up with past its sell-by date technology for years. As often as not, it was down to outdated management techniques. All that was blown away by the Oriental invasion. When the Japanese - and their new wave of machines -disembarked at the Isle of Man, 'Brit bikes' were dead in the water. The TT wins which followed presaged the future - not just for racers, but roadsters. When the Z1 hit the showrooms, the future had arrived.

The Z1's twin-camshaft, four-cylinder motor left its road-going rivals reeling! The ageing 'thumpers', twins and triples simply could not compete. The Z1 took cycle parts, too, to another level. Performance stats had gone up a gear … well, several gears, actually! The 'King' came, saw, and conquered! Before long, the British bike industry was a mere memory.

The new bike heralded Kawasaki's iconic 'Z'-series. A plethora of 'superbikes' - from the 'big four' Japanese manufacturers - followed. Never again would bikers settle for second-best. From that point on, a test-ride delivered outstanding performance, handling and braking - or the deal was off! The Kawasaki Z1 had secured its place in motorcycling's pantheon. As for Brit bikes ... the king was dead, long live the 'King'!

Moto Guzzi Le Mans 850

Moto Guzzi Le Mans 850 1970s Italian classic motorcycle

Moto Guzzi is rightly renowned for rugged, reliable machines. If any bike is going to get from A to B, a Guzzi stands as good a chance as any. One model, though, that had more going for it than mere practicality, was the Le Mans 850. Strong and purposeful, certainly. But, also a kingpin of two-wheeled design.

The Le Mans' top speed of 130mph was plenty impressive, in '76. Especially, since it was delivered by shaft-drive. A relatively heavy power-train, it is more associated with low maintenance, than high performance. So, like its second to none Italian styling, the Le Mans motor was simple - but effective.

The engine in question was an across-the-frame V-twin. So interlinked is it with Moto Guzzi, that it has attained iconic status among fans of the Mandello del Lario marque. Rather like another well-known V-twin - made in Milwaukee. Except that Harley-Davidson opted for a longitudinal layout. Guzzi's mill was first installed in a 3-wheeler ... built to cross mountains. Suffice it to say, torque was not an issue! It would be a long journey from such icy wastes - to the furnace of France's most famous racetrack. But, the Le Mans ate up the miles ... and never missed a beat. Which probably goes some way to explaining why Moto Guzzi - founded in '21 - has outlasted any other European motorcycle manufacturer. The Le Mans 850, then, blended style, power and solidity - in pretty much equal measure!

BMW R90S

BMW R90S 1970s German classic motorcycle

The BMW R90S' biggest asset was its engine. The 'Boxer' has been a BMW bastion for decades. It was thus dubbed because of the way the flat-twin's pistons 'punch' their way in and out - or, 'reciprocate', for the technically-minded. The set-up provided surprisingly swift progress. It is, after all, not a layout famed for its sophistication. However, it was well-balanced and, of course, impressively engineered.

Okay, so the R90S may have been a tad behind some of its rivals in all-out power terms. But, it more than made up the deficit with its styling. A neat bikini fairing topped off stylish smoked orange paintwork.

Within biking circles, BMWs - and their riders - enjoy a unique reputation. A BMW has long been the machine of choice for the respectable, law-abiding biker. Smooth, suave and well-heeled, 'hell-raising' does not come naturally to them. BMW bikes were always a natural fit. In its blending of upright solidity - and dashing good looks - the BMW R90S is considered a two-wheeled design classic.

Laverda Jota

Laverda Jota 1970s Italian classic motorcycle

The Laverda Jota was a stalwart of the Seventies superbikes. It combined impressive performance with Italian styling. In '76, the Jota's top speed stat of 140mph was admirable. Particularly, given that it was sourced from just three wallet-hugging cylinders!

Yet - for all its virtues - the bike might never have been launched. Prior to the Jota, Laverda had knocked out a few frankly average motorcycles. Average, but affordable. At the same time, a wave of cheap cars - like the Fiat 500 - rolled into showrooms. Non-bikers - especially, those with families - tended to plump for four wheels. As a result, Laverda came close to going out of business. In the nick of time, the management changed tack. They gave the green light to the two-wheeled exotica for which the firm is now renowned. Classic bike aficionados will forever be in their debt.

But, the bike's British importer also deserves credit. It was they who suggested to Laverda's top brass that the latter pack more power into what was already a perfectly pukka motor. Thank goodness, the marque's managers rose to the challenge. Laverda lovers have not stopped dancing since! Now, they had an engine which did justice to the Jota's impeccably-drawn lines.

Honda CBX1000Z

Honda CBX1000Z 1970s Japanese classic motorcycle

The Honda CBX1000Z was a child of its times. In the Seventies, performance was everything. Japanese superbike performance, that is. At the time, the 'Big Four' - Honda, Suzuki, Kawasaki and Yamaha - were more concerned about how a bike went than how it looked. The 'CBX' could have been cited as a case in point. Its inline-six motor was prioritised over other areas of the bike. Its 24-valve DOHC air-cooled inline-six motor, to be precise. It had been designed by a one-time GP engineer. Most famously, Mike Hailwood's Honda RC166 racer had displayed the virtues of a 6-cylinder layout.

Given the girth of its 6-pot block, the CBX handled well. Its manoeuvrability was still more impressive when its cycle parts were factored in. By today's standards, the tubular steel frame, telescopic forks, narrow wheels and high-profile tyres were spindly. And dwarfed by the mass of the motor. Straight handlebars - and twin rear shocks - were similarly conventional. In fact, the width of the engine was deceptive. Just 2″ wider than the CB750. That was due to its unusual layout. The alternator and ignition parts were located behind the block. Well out of the way, should the bike ever find itself sliding down the road!

Flat out, the CBX did 140mph. Striking though that was, it was as nothing next to the noise the bike made reaching it. The high-pitched howl of a CBX at full chat is something that once heard, is never forgotten. Especially with a slightly less than legal pipe fitted. At which point, it sounds as much like a jet plane as it does a motorcycle! Sadly, the CBX did not sell well. In time, its design would be diluted down into less extreme machines. But, motorcycling would be the poorer without bikes like the CBX. Look on them as a challenge. Get a corner just right - and there are few feelings like it. The Honda CBX1000Z was flawed, for sure ... but fantastic fun!

Ducati 900SS

Ducati 900SS 1970s Italian classic motorcycle

Of all the Seventies superbikes, the Ducati 900SS was one of the most pure of purpose. Unburdened by such 'add-ons' as an electric start and a pillion seat, the SS roared 'race-bred' - as loudly as its Conti pipes!

Ducati's proprietary desmodromic valve-gear took pride of place in the 900's V-twin engine. As a result, it solidly piled on revs - enough for the Duc to accrue a top speed of 132mph.

Yet, the 900's technical prowess seemed to fade into shade, in light of its visual virtues. Achingly good-looking, the Ducati 900SS is arguably beyond compare, styling-wise!