Showing posts with label 1980s Motorcycles. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1980s Motorcycles. Show all posts

BMW K1

BMW K1 1980s German motorbike

Back in the day, BMW bikes were borderline staid. That all changed with the K1. Design-led flair and panache were dripping off it. The K1 looked the absolute business - and BMW did plenty of it, as a result!

In engineering terms, the K1 was straight out of the top drawer. That said, BMW know no other way! Suspension was set up per the Paralever system - specially formulated for shaft-drive power trains. The K-series engine featured four horizontally-opposed cylinders - the flat layout having been a BMW trademark since the year dot. This time around, though, it was fuel-injected. Cue 100bhp. And a top speed of 145mph.

The K1 was stylistically stunning. Paint and bodywork blended into a cool mélange. 'Cool' was not a word which had been over-associated with BMW, in the past ... at least, not so far as motorcycles were concerned. The K1, though, was a visual harbinger of 'Beemers' to come. Indeed, BMW would go on to produce some of the best-looking bikes on the planet. And, of course, it went without saying, they also exuded a touch of Teutonic class!

Yamaha FZR1000

Yamaha FZR1000 1980s Japanese superbike

'Genesis' is one heck of a tag to give a motorbike. But, that is what the first version of the Yamaha FZR1000 was called, when introduced in '87. No pressure, then! In the beginning, there had been the FZR1000 race bike. That begat the Genesis roadster ... which multiplied in great profusion. The first follow-up model was the Exup - or Exhaust Ultimate Powervalve. By that point, the FZR1000 was already selling in shedloads.

The FZR topped out at a dizzying 168mph. Output was 140bhp. It tipped the scales at a scant 461lb dry. 'Upside-down forks', on later models, reduced unsprung weight - and thereby improved handling. A 17″ front wheel - and radial tyre - helped raise the roadholding bar. At the back, a rock-solid swingarm pivoted on an aluminium twin-spar Deltabox frame. The engine's electronic Exup system extended the FZR's powerband into the middle of the rev range.

The FZR was one sweetly-styled sports bike. The twists and turns of its bodywork went every which way. Rather than being a cause of confusion, though - in this case, it 'worked'. With the FZR1000, then, Yamaha gave a blank sheet to its engineers/designers. They clearly seized the invitation to move the motorcycle onto new ground!

Honda VFR 750F

Honda VFR 750F 1980s Japanese sports bike

The Honda VFR 750F was about as versatile as a motorbike gets. Indeed, it is often cited as the ultimate all-rounder. The VFR played footsie with perfection ... then improved on it! Fast, fine-handling - and styled with finesse. What more could a motorcyclist want?

In engine layout terms, the Japanese in-line four had the market pretty much covered. Until the VFR arrived, that is. Its water-cooled, 16-valve V4 was to prove a more than viable alternative. The motor's 100bhp output gave a top speed of 150mph. Sweet stats, by any standards! Combined with that, the VFR's 460lb dry weight was reasonably slim for a bike of its size. Plus, the VFR was fitted with a sturdy twin-spar aluminium frame. That was state of the art chassis technology, at the time.

As if all that were not enough - the VFR impressed visually, too. Not only did its bodywork sear through air, but the paintwork was sprayed to last. Hondas have long been known for their build quality. Deftly designed ducts sat by discreetly drawn graphics. Neat tucks and folds were the order of the day. Sales-wise, the VFR was a banker from the off. And Honda needed it to be. The VFR's predecessor - the VF750 - had damaged the Japanese giant. It had taken reliability issues to another level! Technically, then, the VFR 750F more than restored bikers' faith in Honda. As a bonus - it did so in impeccable style!

Suzuki GSX-R750

Suzuki GSX-R750 1980s Japanese motorcycle

By no means every motorbike can claim to be the first of its kind. One that can is the Suzuki GSX-R750. So closely did its looks reflect those of Suzuki's '85 Endurance racer, that it was designated a 'race-replica'. Performance-wise, too, it did not fall far short. 145mph on the road was not for the faint-hearted!

The 'Gixer', then, was built to go fast. Corners were no obstacle to that mission statement. The GSX-R's light aluminium frame - and beefed-up forks - made it highly 'flickable'. Powering out of bends, though, needed the rev-needle firmly to the right. The GSX-R's power-band was uncompromising. Low-down 'grunt' was not its strong suit. Keep the revs up, though, and you were flying. When slowing could not be put off any longer, state of the art stoppers responded with relish.

The first GSX-R 750 was dubbed the 'slab-side'. That referenced the perpendicular lines of its design. Certainly, it communicated solidity - and a sense of purpose. So - single-handedly - the Suzuki GSX-R750 sparked the 'race-rep' revolution. After that, roadsters really were not ever the same again!