Showing posts with label Classic Italian Motorcycles. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Classic Italian Motorcycles. Show all posts

MV Agusta 750 Sport

MV Agusta 750 Sport 1970s Italian classic sports bike

The MV Agusta 750 Sport was race-bred. A straight line could be drawn from the roadster to Meccanica Verghera's competition machines. They were fettled in Gallerate, near Milan, Italy. MV ruled the racing roost, at the time. The 750 Sport's clip-on 'bars - and humped-back seat - gave the game away. Add to them, a 4-leading-shoe Grimeca front brake - and a chrome quartet of megaphone exhausts. All were clear pointers to the Sport's race-track roots.

The 750's top speed of 120mph was good going in the Seventies. Especially, since the bike was a tad portly. It weighed in at 506lb. Its in-line 4-cylinder engine produced 69bhp - at 7,900rpm. Power was supplied via gear-driven twin overhead camshafts.

Compared to its rivals in the showrooms, the 750 Sport was expensive. Suffice to say, it did not sell well. To be fair, MV had little choice but to up the price. The complexities of the Sport's engine - and labour-intensive production processes - all had to be paid for. From a purely commercial standpoint, then, the Sport turned out to be another nail in MV's coffin. Count Domenico Agusta had founded MV, in '45. In '71, he suffered a fatal heart attack. With him went the soul of MV. Indeed, it was not long afterward that the marque shut up shop. The lacklustre sales of the 750 Sport had not helped. From a non-commercial point of view, however, the MV Agusta 750 Sport summed up the spirit of motorcycling like few other bikes!

Ducati 250 Desmo

Ducati 250 Desmo 1970s Italian classic motorbike

Ducati's 250 Desmo was a nailed down design classic! The famous firm began in Bologna, in '26 - producing electrical parts. That might generate a few wry grins amongst bikers of a certain age. Italian machines have traditionally been praised more for aesthetic than technical perfection.

Ducati's signature set-up, back in the day, was 'desmodromic'. It saw engine valves closed by cams - rather than springs. That provided more precise control of valvegear moving parts. For a marque so synonymous with styling, 'desmo' was definitely a feather in Ducati's cap. The 250 was the baby of the newly engineered range. Though of reduced capacity compared to its bigger siblings, the 250 was still blessed with a fair lick of speed. Indeed, it fell just a tad short of the totemic 'ton'. In handling terms, too, the 250 had plenty in its favour. Weighing in at less than 300lb - and with finely-tuned suspension - its rubber side remained resolutely glued to the tarmac. Saying that, clip-on 'bars, rear-set footrests and a solo seat coaxed riders into finding the limits of adhesion!

The Desmo was designed by Leo Tartarini. He drew the 250 with simple, strong lines. They were all that was needed. The bike had dynamism built-in - by dint of its 'racy' parts list. So, the 250 was as strong visually, as it was technically. Certainly, its desmodromic valve-train was a key asset. But, it also possessed poised and purposeful looks - belying its size. Dimunitive it may have been, but the Ducati 250 Desmo married technological innovation with innate good looks!

Benelli 750 Sei

Benelli 750 Sei 1970s Italian classic motorbike

It is a truism that the Italians are past masters of design. In engineering terms, too, they have often been ahead of the game. How far the latter held true for the Benelli Sei, though, is a moot point. For sure, the Sei was visually impressive. Six-cylinder bikes usually are. The jury was out, though, in the court of motorcycle performance stats.

Certainly, the Sei's engine looked superb. For non-Europeans, by the way, sei is Italian for six. As did its twin sets of triple-stacked exhaust pipes. When it came to horsepower, however, it was another story. Even by '75 standards, the Sei's top speed of 118mph was hardly earth-moving. Not for a six-cylinder sports bike, anyway. In the market-led surge of Seventies superbikes, Benelli's rivals all supplied quicker machines. And Ducati, Laverda and Moto Guzzi needed half as many pots. Or less!

It was not like Benelli did not know how to make bikes go fast. After all, they had been GP 250cc world champions, in 1950. And then again, in '69. But - at least in the case of the Sei - race success did not trickle down to the roadster. Saying that, the sleek contours of the Sei's 'six-pack' bodywork certainly helped. So far as buyers were concerned, they went a long way toward offsetting what the Benelli Sei lacked in the 'go' department!

Moto Guzzi Falcone

Moto Guzzi Falcone 1950s Italian classic motorcycle

The Moto Guzzi Falcone was one of the most successful machines in the firm's history. It flew onto the European bike scene in 1950. Falcone was fitting - since Moto Guzzi's emblem is an eagle. That was decided when one of the founders - Giovanni Ravelli - was killed in a plane crash. In tribute, his two partners co-opted the winged insignia of their air corps.

The Falcone was the latest in a line of flat-single-cylinder bikes from Guzzi. They took in everything from luxury tourers to pared-down racers. Twin versions of the Falcone were offered - Sport and Touring. They kept the Falcone flag flying until '76 - a full 26 years after its launch. It became an icon on Italian roads. In Sport mode - with its flat 'bars and rear-set footrests - the Falcone was an impressive sight. Its fire-engine red paintwork was eye-catching, to say the least. Ordinarily, top speed was 85mph. But the cognoscenti knew that a sprinkling of Dondolino engine parts served up an appetising 100mph. With a bracing shot of low-down grunt as an apéritif.

The blueprint for the Falcone's 498cc engine was drawn in 1920. Back when Carlo Guzzi designed the first of the bikes that would bear his name. The 4-stroke motor - with its horizontal cylinder - had plenty of stamina. It just kept on going - whatever was asked of it. Moto Guzzi has been around for a century now. Its products have always been stylish - but with a homely feel, to boot. Borne up by their ever-loyal fan base, here is to another 100 years of gorgeous Guzzis. And more bikes with the finesse of the Falcone!

Laverda Jota

Laverda Jota 1970s Italian classic motorcycle

The Laverda Jota was a stalwart of the Seventies superbikes. It combined impressive performance with Italian styling. In '76, the Jota's top speed stat of 140mph was admirable. Particularly, given that it was sourced from just three wallet-hugging cylinders!

Yet - for all its virtues - the bike might never have been launched. Prior to the Jota, Laverda had knocked out a few frankly average motorcycles. Average, but affordable. At the same time, a wave of cheap cars - like the Fiat 500 - rolled into showrooms. Non-bikers - especially, those with families - tended to plump for four wheels. As a result, Laverda came close to going out of business. In the nick of time, the management changed tack. They gave the green light to the two-wheeled exotica for which the firm is now renowned. Classic bike aficionados will forever be in their debt.

But, the bike's British importer also deserves credit. It was they who suggested to Laverda's top brass that the latter pack more power into what was already a perfectly pukka motor. Thank goodness, the marque's managers rose to the challenge. Laverda lovers have not stopped dancing since! Now, they had an engine which did justice to the Jota's impeccably-drawn lines.

Gilera Saturno

Gilera Saturno 1950s Italian classic motorcycle

The Gilera Saturno was launched in '46. Its heyday, though, came in the Fifties. In the fickle realm of motorbike manufacturing, Gilera was a big player in that fashionable decade. After that, the firm met with mixed fortunes. But - in the '50s at least - the Saturno was a flagship for the Italian brand. It rolled into the showrooms in Sport, Touring and Competition guises. And immediately began to sell well.

The Saturno was a hit on both road and track. The production racer version was competitive for many seasons. Indeed, it remained so for some time after the bike's production run finished - at the fag-end of the '50s.

In roadster mode, too, the Saturno stayed tethered to the tarmac. That was largely thanks to its telescopic forks - and vertical rear shocks. It rapidly gained a reputation as a performance bike of its era. Towards the end, Gilera linked up with Piaggio and Vespa. It found a much-needed niche as part of the scooter scene. Illustrious though those names were - and are even now - for Gilera, its best days were gone. The Saturno, though, still shone a light for the glory years!

Ducati 900SS

Ducati 900SS 1970s Italian classic motorcycle

Of all the Seventies superbikes, the Ducati 900SS was one of the most pure of purpose. Unburdened by such 'add-ons' as an electric start and a pillion seat, the SS roared 'race-bred' - as loudly as its Conti pipes!

Ducati's proprietary desmodromic valve-gear took pride of place in the 900's V-twin engine. As a result, it solidly piled on revs - enough for the Duc to accrue a top speed of 132mph.

Yet, the 900's technical prowess seemed to fade into shade, in light of its visual virtues. Achingly good-looking, the Ducati 900SS is arguably beyond compare, styling-wise!