Showing posts with label Laverda Classic Motorcycles. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Laverda Classic Motorcycles. Show all posts

Laverda Montjuïc Mk2

Laverda Montjuic Mk2 1980s Italian classic sports bike

When you bought a Laverda Montjuïc Mk2, you got what it said on the tin. Well, on the side-panel, at any rate. Montjuïc Park was a mountain-based motor racing circuit in Barcelona, Spain. A street circuit, that is. Which told you most of what you needed to know about the machine you had just acquired. Conceptually, it modelled the Formula bikes Laverda built for their single-make race series.

Unfortunately, the racing concept was not entirely realised in the roadster. Laverda had enjoyed substantial success at Montjuïc - not least because of the sure-footed handling of their bikes. And - in terms of agility - the Mk2 came close to emulating the track tools' prowess. That was mainly due to its light weight, tubular-steel frame and Marzocchi suspension. Likewise, Brembo disc brakes helped replicate the racers' stop-on-a-sixpence precision. Even the high-speed weave - which had plagued the Montjuïc Mk1 - had been seen off by the Mk2's frame-mounted fairing.

What took the edge off the new Montjuïc was its speed - or lack thereof. As mentioned, the Mk2's manoeuvrability was razor-sharp. Straight-line speed - not so much. Throttle to the stop, the needle hovered around the 110mph mark. Whilst that was adequate, it hardly set the world alight. Though an ear-splitting exhaust note did what it could to redress the balance. To be fair, the Mk2 was powered by a 497cc parallel twin motor. Hardly cutting edge. Indeed, it ran without air-filtering - which might have sped things up a bit! For all that, a 'racer's crouch' riding position signalled the Mk2's intent. And the Montjuïc's high price tag seemed to promise lots of whizz for your lire. Anyway, its relative lack of power was offset by other virtues. It looked Laverda lovely, standing still. And the lines it carved through corners would have pleased a maturing Michelangelo. Just that pesky top speed stat let Laverda's side down a tad. Other than that, the Montjuïc Mk2 made hay in the Spanish sunshine. Before flying back to Breganze, Italy ... at 110mph!