Showing posts with label Moto Guzzi. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Moto Guzzi. Show all posts

Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000

Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 1990s Italian sports bike

It is probably not a bad marketing plan to name a bike after an iconic American circuit. It is one fraught with danger, however. Turn out a machine which does not do justice to that arena ... and you will look a tad daft! No such worries, though, for Moto Guzzi. When the Daytona 1000 was launched - in '92 - its moniker was nothing if not apt. After all, the Daytona was designed by 'Dr John' Wittner. He was an ex-racer/engineer. Indeed - back in the day - he had jacked in dentistry, to go to Guzzi. Not surprising, really. To fans of the brand, Guzzi's Mandello HQ was near-mythical. Dr John successfully campaigned Guzzis in the late '80s. Now, he sought to cement that legacy - in the shape of a road-going superbike.

The Daytona was directly descended from track-based exploits. It was a gimme, then, that it handled beautifully. Of course, the Daytona engine was suitably detuned. That said, it was still fitted with fuel injection - via its four valves per cylinder. 95bhp was duly on tap - equating to a top speed of 150mph. In tandem with that, the V-twin's torque curve was typically steep.

When it comes to motorcycles, Moto Guzzi have honed many a two-wheeled gem over the years. The Daytona 1000 was just the latest in a long line of dependable, attractive products, from the Italian stalwart. In the Daytona 1000, Dr John had dished up a mouth-watering superbike. The ex-dentist's two-wheeled delights would be savoured by bikers for years to come. Many a radiant smile resulted!

Moto Guzzi Falcone

Moto Guzzi Falcone 1950s Italian classic motorcycle

The Moto Guzzi Falcone was one of the most successful machines in the firm's history. It flew onto the European bike scene in 1950. Falcone was fitting - since Moto Guzzi's emblem is an eagle. That was decided when one of the founders - Giovanni Ravelli - was killed in a plane crash. In tribute, his two partners co-opted the winged insignia of their air corps.

The Falcone was the latest in a line of flat-single-cylinder bikes from Guzzi. They took in everything from luxury tourers to pared-down racers. Twin versions of the Falcone were offered - Sport and Touring. They kept the Falcone flag flying until '76 - a full 26 years after its launch. It became an icon on Italian roads. In Sport mode - with its flat 'bars and rear-set footrests - the Falcone was an impressive sight. Its fire-engine red paintwork was eye-catching, to say the least. Ordinarily, top speed was 85mph. But the cognoscenti knew that a sprinkling of Dondolino engine parts served up an appetising 100mph. With a bracing shot of low-down grunt as an apéritif.

The blueprint for the Falcone's 498cc engine was drawn in 1920. Back when Carlo Guzzi designed the first of the bikes that would bear his name. The 4-stroke motor - with its horizontal cylinder - had plenty of stamina. It just kept on going - whatever was asked of it. Moto Guzzi has been around for a century now. Its products have always been stylish - but with a homely feel, to boot. Borne up by their ever-loyal fan base, here is to another 100 years of gorgeous Guzzis. And more bikes with the finesse of the Falcone!

Moto Guzzi Le Mans 850

Moto Guzzi Le Mans 850 1970s Italian classic motorcycle

Moto Guzzi is rightly renowned for rugged, reliable machines. If any bike is going to get from A to B, a Guzzi stands as good a chance as any. One model, though, that had more going for it than mere practicality, was the Le Mans 850. Strong and purposeful, certainly. But, also a kingpin of two-wheeled design.

The Le Mans' top speed of 130mph was plenty impressive, in '76. Especially, since it was delivered by shaft-drive. A relatively heavy power-train, it is more associated with low maintenance, than high performance. So, like its second to none Italian styling, the Le Mans motor was simple - but effective.

The engine in question was an across-the-frame V-twin. So interlinked is it with Moto Guzzi, that it has attained iconic status among fans of the Mandello del Lario marque. Rather like another well-known V-twin - made in Milwaukee. Except that Harley-Davidson opted for a longitudinal layout. Guzzi's mill was first installed in a 3-wheeler ... built to cross mountains. Suffice it to say, torque was not an issue! It would be a long journey from such icy wastes - to the furnace of France's most famous racetrack. But, the Le Mans ate up the miles ... and never missed a beat. Which probably goes some way to explaining why Moto Guzzi - founded in '21 - has outlasted any other European motorcycle manufacturer. The Le Mans 850, then, blended style, power and solidity - in pretty much equal measure!