Showing posts with label Porsche Classic Cars. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Porsche Classic Cars. Show all posts

Porsche 928

Porsche 928 1970s German classic sports car

The Porsche 928 was the first front-engined car the firm produced. Up to that point, Porsche motors had been rear-mounted. The exception to that rule was the 924 - though that was almost as much Audi as Porsche. In the Seventies, the 928 was sold as a supercar. Indeed, Porsche were banking on it being the new 911. That was not to be. 911 fans stuck stoicly to what they loved. Porsche took the hint. They started targeting the 928 solely at the GT market.

The landmark front-mounted motor was a 4.5-litre V8. Built in Germany, it was smooth, tractable and beautifully-engineered. But - in some drivers' eyes - it had a flaw. It was not a 911! In its first iteration, the 928 pulled a top speed of 143mph. That climbed to 171, in the course of its run. Certainly, not to be sniffed at. But, also not enough to keep up with a 911. Not in a specification race, at any rate! The 928's gearbox was a 4-speed, rear-mounted manual - or, a 5-speed Mercedes automatic. Output was 240bhp. The 928S upped it to 300.

Styling-wise, the 928 was on seriously solid ground. Its profile, in particular, was pure coupé. The interior, too, was more than impressive. Its most striking feature was the fascia - which visually echoed the steering-wheel. It was a cosseting cabin, in every respect. On top of that, the 928's ride and handling were never less than reassuring. Over time, there would be S4, GT and GTS versions of the car. Each of them ushered in incremental improvements. The 928, then, was a significant addition to the Porsche roster. Even if, for some, it would never be in the same league as the 911. Saying that, nor would any other car!

Porsche 356

Porsche 356 1940s German classic sports car

The Porsche 356 was the start of a design dynasty. Ferdinand Porsche opened his studio in '31. It would be a further fifteen years before the first Porsche production car. When it arrived, it was no coincidence that the 356 was similar to the VW Beetle. Dr Porsche had penned that car, too. The 356's compact and rounded lines oozed understated charm. In the Fifties, it was the small - but perfectly-formed - 356 which cemented Porsche in the public eye. Right up until '65, in fact - when the Porsche 911 hit centre stage.

For the first four years, the 956 was manufactured in Austria. It was fitted with a flat-four push-rod engine. Rear-mounted - and topped off with a cute grille - the air-cooled motor kept time in pleasingly pulsating fashion. With a capacity of just 1,100cc, it made a mere 40bhp. Top speed was 87mph - pretty good, considering. Suspension was via trailing-link up front - and high-pivot swing axle at the rear. The gearbox was a 4-speed affair. The 356's split windscreen was the most notable design flourish.

The Porsche 356A model was released in '55 - in Germany. Bodywork-wise, it was less rotund than the first version. The new car came with a curved, one-piece screen. Front suspension and steering were revised. A bigger engine had been installed. 1,600cc was a half-litre up on the original. 356 B and C models duly followed. Roadsters, a Karmann coupé, and the Super 75 and Super 90 continued to uprate the technical spec. There was also a 356 Carrera. Indeed, even after the 911 series took over the Porsche reins, the 912 still had a foot in both camps. It was powered by a 356 engine - in a 911 shell. In terms of its legacy, then, the Porsche 356 was pretty pivotal to the Stuttgart marque!

Porsche 911

Porsche 911 1960s German classic sports car

Birthplace for the Porsche 911 was Stuttgart, Germany. On both road and track, its sales and success stats have been off the scale. Throughout motorsport's modern era, the Porsche 911 has been seeing off the best of them. Entire series have been devoted to it. As a rally car, it was right up there. Indeed, the Porsche 911 is virtually synonymous with close, competitive racing. When the 911s come out to play, hamburgers are put on hold!

'Ferry' Porsche - son of founder Ferdinand - drafted the outline design. His own son 'Butzi' fleshed out the details. Many versions of the 911 duly appeared. The Carrera model, in particular, packed panache, as well as power. It sported a 'duck-tail' spoiler, flared wheel arches and racing-derived decals.

Stamina has been key to 911 development. Each model iteration has relentlessly refined its predecessor. By a process of incremental improvement, then, its engineers and designers have reached four-wheeled perfection. In one or other of its now eight variants, the Porsche 911 has been an automotive icon since September '64. Such has been its staying-power that a sports car world without it would be inconceivable!