Showing posts with label Yamaha. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Yamaha. Show all posts

Yamaha YR5

Yamaha YR5 1970s Japanese classic motorbike

The YR5 is a small, but perfectly-formed 'Jap classic'. Torakusu Yamaha founded Nippon Gakki in 1897. The firm went on to become one of the world's biggest makers of musical instruments. In '55, it branched out into motorbikes. Some might say they made sweeter music than Yamaha's previous products! The company logo - a tuning fork - has appeared on the tanks of millions of bikes since. Certainly sweet music to a salesperson's ears! One of the best-sellers was the YR5.

The 'big four' Japanese bike manufacturers introduced precision-engineering hitherto unseen in the industry. Indeed, Torakusu Yamaha had trained to be a clock-maker, prior to starting up Nippon Gakki. The first Yamahas were built with machinery previously used to forge aircraft propellers. Now, that is the kind of component that needs to be got right!

The YR5 was a supreme example of early Japanese bike building. It reached a top speed of 95mph - from only 350cc. Engine layout was reed-valve 2-stroke. In tandem with that, the YR5 weighed just 330lb wet. Acceleration was fierce - right up to 7,000rpm. Traditionally, there has been a trade-off between 'stroker' speed and reliability. The former tended to come at the expense of the latter. Yamaha's 2-strokes, though, gained a reputation for robustness - relatively so, at any rate. The YR5's handling and braking were equally solid. Design-wise, neat and tidy styling set off pristine paintwork. As you would expect, then - with a competitive price-tag attached - the Yamaha YR5 sold by the shedload!

Yamaha YZF R1

Yamaha YZF R1 1990s Japanese superbike

The Yamaha YZF R1 was about as close to a racer as a road-bike gets. Everything about it screamed speed. Its fairing parted air like a shark shifts water. Its tail-piece was sharp enough to shave with. In terms of its tech-spec, the R1 tasted number-crunching good! A power output of 160bhp. A dry weight of 389lb. A top speed of 170mph. Satisfying stats, to be sure!

But, the R1 was not just quick and aerodynamic - it was agile as an acrobat. Indeed, so 'flickable' was it, that it was almost so to a fault. The R1 could made corners a bit too tempting! Short and slim, its wheelbase was minimal. All the better for flying through bends. Engine-wise, there were 5 valves per cylinder. 20 minuscule parts - doing a mechanised dance of staggering precision. Cycle parts were state of the art. Suspension and brakes were razor-responsive. In every department, the R1 excelled. As you would expect, it sold in shedloads!

The R1 is the kind of machine lives get built around. It inspires not so much dedication - as devotion. Whether at R1 owners' rallies, track days or production racing events, the bike instils pride - and confidence - like few others. The Yamaha YZF R1 was a two-wheeled icon. And that will not be changing anytime soon!

Yamaha FZR1000

Yamaha FZR1000 1980s Japanese superbike

'Genesis' is one heck of a tag to give a motorbike. But, that is what the first version of the Yamaha FZR1000 was called, when introduced in '87. No pressure, then! In the beginning, there had been the FZR1000 race bike. That begat the Genesis roadster ... which multiplied in great profusion. The first follow-up model was the Exup - or Exhaust Ultimate Powervalve. By that point, the FZR1000 was already selling in shedloads.

The FZR topped out at a dizzying 168mph. Output was 140bhp. It tipped the scales at a scant 461lb dry. 'Upside-down forks', on later models, reduced unsprung weight - and thereby improved handling. A 17″ front wheel - and radial tyre - helped raise the roadholding bar. At the back, a rock-solid swingarm pivoted on an aluminium twin-spar Deltabox frame. The engine's electronic Exup system extended the FZR's powerband into the middle of the rev range.

The FZR was one sweetly-styled sports bike. The twists and turns of its bodywork went every which way. Rather than being a cause of confusion, though - in this case, it 'worked'. With the FZR1000, then, Yamaha gave a blank sheet to its engineers/designers. They clearly seized the invitation to move the motorcycle onto new ground!